Civic Addressing

You may be noticing signs appearing at the end of your driveway.  You should have received a card with your specific civic address.  These numbers are assigned in accordance with the Provincial guidelines for addressing and are tied to a new road naming scheme.

Roads that run east/west have been assigned a name based on distance from the Canada-U.S. border.  The road which forms the south boundary of the municipality is 72 miles north of the international border, so it is given the name: Road 72N.  The first road north of Road 72N would be Road 73N, the next road north would be Road 74N, and so on.

Roads that run north/south have been assigned a name based on distance from the Principal Meridian.  The road which forms the east boundary of the municipality is 60 miles west of the meridian, so it is given the name Road 60W.  The first road west of Road 60W would be Road 61W, and so on.

The numbering for structures is based on two factors: the “block” of the road segment and the distance that the driveway is located along that road segment.  A rural address comprises a number and a road name, just the same as in any community (e.g. 123 Main Street). The accompanying map demonstrates examples of rural addressing for 3 structures within a square mile. 

On east/west roads the Provincial guidelines recommend that addresses on the south side of the road are even and the addresses on the north side are odd.  Similarly, the north/south roads have even addresses on the west side and odd addresses on the east side.  Note the examples shown in the map follow this convention.

Once the address system is understood, it is relatively easy to locate any addressed property on section roads anywhere in the Province.  This system is extremely useful for emergency responders such as fire, police and ambulance, to find the incident location even if they are unfamiliar with the local area.

Example A: The point shown on Road 103N is 590 metres west of the intersection with Road 68W.  The point is, therefore, in block 68, so the first two digits of the address is “68”.  The distance along the road segment determines the last three digits, in this case: “059” (address numbers increase every 10 metres).

Example B: The point shown on Road 103N is 1,350 metres west of the intersection with Road 68W.  The point is, therefore, in block 68, so the first two digits of the address is “68”.  The distance along the road segment determines the last three digits, in this case: “135”.

Example C: The point shown on PR260 is 1,070 metres north of the intersection with Road 103N.  The point is, therefore, in block 103, so the first two digits of the address is “103”.  The distance along the road segment determines the last three digits, in this case: “107”.

If you have any questions regarding your civic number, or did not receive a card in the mail, please contact the office.